Copenhagen – University of Copenhagen

Copenhagen's Latin Quarter seen from The Round Tower
Copenhagen's Latin Quarter seen from The Round Tower.

Copenhagen

Copenhagen is the capital of Denmark. Nearly 1.3 million people live in the metropolitan area of Copenhagen, making it the most populous city in Scandinavia.

Region of knowledge

The Greater Copenhagen area is Scandinavia's most knowledge-intensive research and business environment with 3.7 million inhabitants, 42,000 researchers, 190,000 students, 19 science parks and innovation incubators and 17 universities or colleges of higher education.

Leading medico and IT region

Greater Copenhagen has a fast growing business community and is internationally known as one of the leading medico and IT regions. The region has a dense collection of universities, hospitals and companies within Biotech, Medtech and Pharma with a focus on research and development. It is home to more than 60 percent of Scandinavia's pharmaceutical industry and is currently Europe's fastest growing biotech cluster.

A sustainable and growing city

Bicycle-friendly Copenhagen aims to become the world's first CO2-neutral capital by 2025. The city is rapidly evolving in terms of housing, urban development and the expansion of infrastructure and public transportation. It has been labelled 'the world's most livable city' several times.

Copenhagen has a lot to offer citizens of all ages. Art exhibitions, sports, culinary treats, music and cultural events. Copenhagen is a youthful city as almost half of the inhabitants are between 20 and 37 years old - with every fourth a student.

Danish values and stability

Denmark ranks among the top-five most peaceful and least corrupt countries in the world. The economy is stable and it is one of the few countries to hold a prime AAA credit rating by Moody's, S&P and Fitch. The Danish krone is tied to the Euro, making exchange rate fluctuations a non-issue.

Dronning Louise's Bro (Queen Louise's Bridge) connects inner Copenhagen and Nørrebro and is frequented by tons of cyclists and pedestrians every single day. Photo by Martin Heiberg
In Copenhagen, 50 percent of all citizens commute by bike every day and there are more bikes than inhabitants.